Solid Waste and Water Management
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Research

RESEARCH FIELD: Solid Waste and Water Management

UdM Researchers working on this field:

  • Dr. Lekhramsingh (Neermal) Latchoomun
  • Mr. Kamleshwar Greedharry
  • Mr Chetanand Ramma

Funded projects

Project 1

Title:

Pressure Control for Leakage Reduction in the Mauritian Water Distribution Network

Duration (start/end):

5 Yrs (2013-2018)

Principal Investigator:

Dr L. Latchoomun

Collaborating partner:

University of Mauritius and Northumbria University

Awarding body or sponsor:

Mauritius Research and Innovative Council

Description of projects:

In pressure-driven demand, the volume of water leaking is very sensible to the distribution pressure especially if the network is damaged. Therefore, if proper pressure control techniques are adopted the loss of treated freshwater can be reduced, increasing the lifetime of existing infrastructures as well. In this research work, a prototype known as a Harmonic Oscillator Tank has been designed and tested on a small experimental network in order to reduce the volume of leaking water without jeopardizing customers’ needs.

Project 2

Title:

Rain Harvesting in Mauritius: a decentralized water supply

Duration (start/end):

Tentatively August 2020 to July 2021

Principal Investigator:

Mr. Kamlesh Greedharry

Collaborating partner:

Under negotiation with Water Resources Unit/Central Water Authority

Awarding body or sponsor:

Mauritius Research and Innovative Council

Description of projects:

Mauritius is classified as a water-stressed country. Usable freshwater potential estimated at 1300 Mm3 per year equivalent to 1083 m3/person/year, which puts Mauritius in the water-stressed category. Water demand has increased by 56 % from 1990 to 2006. The water demand in 2007 was estimated at 884Mm3, of which 48 % was used for irrigation, 28.7% for hydropower and 22.7% for domestic, industrial and tourism purposes. Around 87 % of total freshwater supply came from surface water and the remaining 13 % from groundwater. During the period 1993 to 2007, the domestic per capita consumption of water has risen from 141 to 162 litres per day. With rising consumption, surface water supplies have to be supplemented by groundwater, which accounted for 53% of total potable consumption in 2007. By 2040, total demand is projected at 1200 Mm3 per year, close to the utilizable renewable potential of 1300 Mm3 as per the statement of the National Programme on Sustainable Consumption and Production of 2008.
With a view to mitigate the effects of temporal water shortages to cover domestic, commercial, agricultural and industrial needs, it is imperative to investigate the options available to increase water productivity within sustainable resources. This study therefore focuses on the potential of rainwater harvesting systems (RWH) in Mauritius as a decentralized water supply.

Any further inquiries?

Please contact on the following email: [email protected]